Upcoming Events

  • picture of Aaron Fox
Wed Feb 21, 2018 
3:30pm - 5:00 pm
UCSB Library, Special Research Collections (3rd Floor, Mountain Side)
 
Abstract: In this paper I will offer a broad view of “repatriation” and “recovery” projects undertaken in recent years by activists and ethnomusicologists working with archives of recorded sound.  Even when such work is focused on applied goals in the present, the turn toward repatriation suggests historical critique of ethnomusicology’s longstanding interdependence with militarism and colonialism. I connect the history of recording and “collecting" Native American music in the early 20th century to the later Cold War context in which contemporary ethnographic ethnomusicology emerged in its current institutionalized form -- in part through a reification of the earlier 20th century archive as ahistorical cultural data,  I interrogate the view of sound “archives” (and the work they have done to discipline our understanding of “music”) as sites of memory and scholarship in order to stress their importance as sites of domination and resistance, suggesting  a phenomenology of the "archival recording" that assumes a history of hegemonic mediation. I advance a specific critique of “repatriation” discourse in ethnomusicology as an ethically fraught domain, however necessary.  The paper is based on 12 years of work “repatriating” recordings from the Laura Boulton Collection at Columbia University. 
 
Bio: Aaron A. Fox is Associate Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University. In recent years Fox has focused on issues of cultural and intellectual property and the repatriation of Native American cultural resources, as part of a broader interest in cultural survival and sustainability and music-centered community activism. His current project entails work with several Indigenous communities to return and recover recordings held by Columbia University’s Center for Ethnomusicology, including collaborative work with numerous Indigenous scholar/activists.  Fox's publications on this topic include “The Archive of the Archive” in The Routledge Companion to Cultural Property (2017) and “Repatriation as Re-Animation Through Reciprocity” in The Cambridge History of World Music: Vol. 1 (North America). His book, Real Country: Music and Language in Working-Class Culture, was published by Duke University Press in 2004.
 
Aaron A. Fox

 

  1. February 21, 2018 -
    3:30pm to 5:00pm
  • poster of the lecture
February 28th
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Music 1145
 
This talk examines dohori song and intimate politics in Nepal, with attention to the micro politics of intimate relationships negotiated through improvised sung duets (dohori), and also through the inclusion of broader politics in these duets as the political and media landscapes changed throughout the 1990s and 2000s. Discussion of political topics in dohori lyrics was strictly forbidden in competitions and the state-run media up until 1990. I look at the slow movement toward including party politics and specific social issues in mainstream dohori performance and recordings in the period directly after the end of Nepal's civil war between Maoists and government forces. This period was characterized by calls for progressive reform, including changes in the ways intimate and public spheres were conceptualized politically and musically. Bringing the "public" world of party politics into the "intimate" sphere of dohori performance, this ongoing movement encompassed the inclusion of love in songs sung for party political platforms and vice versa, and attempts to create social change through the words, music, videos, and live performance of dohori songs. 
 
Anna Stirr is Associate Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii-Manoa. Her research focuses on music, dance, language, intimacy, and politics in South Asia, particularly in Nepal and the Himalayan region. Her first book, Singing Across Divides: Music and Intimate Politics in Nepal (Oxford University Press, 2017), looks at improvised dohori question-answer songs as culturally intimate, gendered expressions of ideas of nation, belonging, and heritage, within a cycle of migration and media circulation that spans the globe. She performs Nepali folk music as a singer, flutist, and percussionist.
 
Co-sponsored by the Ethnomusciology Program, the Distinguished Lecturer Series in the Music Department, and the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Music.

 

  1. February 28, 2018 -
    3:30pm to 5:00pm

The Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Music (CISM) is an association of faculty and students at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) that promotes the study of music across academic disciplines. CISM begins with the position that music is an important and powerful cultural practice, which becomes fundamental in shaping the materialities and methods of social life. By sponsoring diverse projects that engage multiple fields of knowledge, CISM works to expand the boundaries of traditional music research by creating an environment for high-level study and discussion of music that is not restricted to specialists.